News Releases

April 14, 2011

Vermont’s Walleye Fishing Starts Soon

The best walleye fishing in New England is about to begin in several Vermont rivers and lakes, according to the Vermont Fish and Wildlife Department. The department is reminding anglers that walleye fishing season starts in much of the state on the first Saturday in May, the 7th this year, and that regulations vary, depending on the water you are fishing.

In all waters of Vermont except Lake Carmi, Chittenden Reservoir and the Connecticut River, walleye and sauger have an 18” minimum length requirement and 3-fish daily limit. The open season is from the first Saturday in May to March 15.

Lake Carmi has a slot limit for walleye because of the lake’s high productivity and high rate of walleye harvest. The minimum length is 15 inches, all walleye between 17 and 19 inches must be released. The daily limit is five walleye, but only one may be over 19 inches long. The season is open May 7 through March 15, 2011.

Chittenden Reservoir has special walleye regulations in order to produce large walleye that can help control its over-abundant yellow perch population and provide anglers with an opportunity to harvest a trophy walleye. The minimum length is 22 inches, the daily limit is two, and the season is open June 1 through March 15.

Connecticut River walleye fishing rules are set by New Hampshire.

Excellent walleye fishing opportunities occur each spring in the lakes mentioned above as well as in Lake Champlain and its tributaries: the Missisquoi River, Lamoille River, Winooski River, and Otter Creek. The Northeast Kingdom also offers walleye fishing opportunities in Salem Lake, Island Pond, Clyde Pond, and the Clyde River. Vermont’s state record walleye weighed 14.55 lbs. and was caught in Lake Champlain by Richard Levesque of Swanton in 2010.

Caption for attached photo:

Photo by Wayne Laroche

These anglers were having good luck fishing for walleyes in the Missisquoi River during a previous spring. Vermont’s walleye fishing season begins May 7, in most of the state.

Source: Department of Fish and Wildlife
Last Updated at: April 14, 2011 14:49:25